Leading scientific research organizations trust Windcube® Lidar solutions—and so can you.

Renowned academic, research, and government institutions choose Windcube® Lidar for its global acceptance, proven scientific pedigree, and track record of performance excellence. 

NRG Systems helps you resolve atmospheric risk.

Provision Research Advances in Boundary Layer Remote Sensing

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Statement of Guidance (2014) on Observations for global Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) concluded that “critical atmospheric variables that are not adequately measured by current or planned systems are (in order of priority): 1) wind profiles at all levels, 2) temperature and humidity profiles of adequate vertical resolution in a cloudy area, and 3) precipitation.”

Windcube Lidar is the pre-eminent wind reconstruction solution for boundary layer sensing, featuring an infinite combination of scan sequence configurations, autonomous remote operation, and real-time data collection and dissemination capabilities. 

Advanced Model Calibration, Validation, and Assimilation Capabilities

Exciting advances in numerical weather prediction (NWP) modeling are underway, driven in large part by the ability to assimilate volumetric wind, temperature, and moisture observations on increasingly resolved temporal and spatial scales. Complex terrain flows. Turbulence characterizations. Aerosol cloud interactions. Clear air dynamics. Surface heat flux and temperature boundary conditions. All with implications for the advancement of more skillful modeling solutions and actionable intelligence across a large segment of the U.S. economy. 

Figure 1: Wind Speed (m/s) and Direction Profiles from the NOAA ESRL ‘dalek01’ Windcube 200S, in support of the WFIP 2 Project, Arlington, OR. Image depicts turbulence eddies, directional wind shear, and mixing levels through the boundary layer, June 27, 2016 (Courtesy NOAA Earth Sciences Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division).

Figure 1: Wind Speed (m/s) and Direction Profiles from the NOAA ESRL ‘dalek01’ Windcube 200S, in support of the WFIP 2 Project, Arlington, OR. Image depicts turbulence eddies, directional wind shear, and mixing levels through the boundary layer, June 27, 2016 (Courtesy NOAA Earth Sciences Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division).

Figure 2: Aerosol Backscatter Signal Strength Profiles from the NOAA ESRL ‘dalek01’ Windcube 200S, in support of the WFIP 2 Project, Arlington, OR. Image depicts increasing depth of mixed boundary layer under peak insolation, June 27, 2016 (Courtesy NOAA Earth Sciences Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division).

Figure 2: Aerosol Backscatter Signal Strength Profiles from the NOAA ESRL ‘dalek01’ Windcube 200S, in support of the WFIP 2 Project, Arlington, OR. Image depicts increasing depth of mixed boundary layer under peak insolation, June 27, 2016 (Courtesy NOAA Earth Sciences Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division).

Figure 3: Vertical Velocity Variance Profiles from the NOAA ESRL ‘dalek01’ Windcube 200S, in support of the WFIP 2 Project, Arlington, OR.  Image depicts increasing vertical turbulence under peak insolation, June 27, 2016 (Courtesy NOAA Earth Sciences Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division).

Figure 3: Vertical Velocity Variance Profiles from the NOAA ESRL ‘dalek01’ Windcube 200S, in support of the WFIP 2 Project, Arlington, OR.  Image depicts increasing vertical turbulence under peak insolation, June 27, 2016 (Courtesy NOAA Earth Sciences Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division).

Windcube Lidar solutions are providing the basis for unrivaled advances in atmospheric research. Ask how we can help advance yours.